knit. spin. weave.

Decisions, decisions...

Posted by lisa reid on

As one of the teachers here at Wabi Sabi, I answer a lot of questions about the many classes that we offer.  Since there is usually quite a diverse offering, it can sometimes be hard to decide exactly what class to take.  This is a quick breakdown to help you decide what the best fit is for you.  Our classes break down into four main categories:

1.  Introductory Classes

Our introduction classes are aimed at complete beginners, and assume no prior knowledge about the craft.  If you have been knitting off-and-on for a few years, and have mastered the basics, then this probably isn't an ideal fit, as you will be bored and your classmates will be intimidated by your impressive skillset.   If, on the other hand, you are struggling with the basics (knit, purl, cast on, and cast off), then our introduction to knitting class is definitely a good fit for you.

2.  Technique Classes

If you are looking to build your skills in a particular direction or pick up a new technique, it is worth looking to see if there is a class that matches up well to your interests.  We try to offer a variety of classes that focus on particular skills, whether it is how to knit mittenssocks, or techniques like brioche, colourwork, or steeking.  These classes tend to be offered on a seasonal basis, so if you don't see what you're looking for, keep checking back or take it as a project class (see below!).  

It is important when taking classes in this category to make sure that you meet the skill requirements (which are listed in the description), as most assume some skills.  If you don't have this foundation, you may find it difficult to keep up with the class and get full value for your time.

We occasionally are able to bring in guest teachers, who usually teach classes in these categories.  If you see a class you are interested in, sign up right away as they tend to fill up quickly!

3. Information Workshops

 We also offer workshop-style classes that teach things like fixing mistakes and learning about how to choose great yarn on a regular basis.  These classes tend to be one-session classes, and are quite focussed in their scope.  

4.  Project Classes (also known as Knit Your Own Project Classes)

If you are a knitter already, and have a project that you are working on and need help with, then the best class to take is one of our project classes.  We run these frequently, and at different time slots, and they are essentially a class designed entirely around what you, the knitter, want to make.  Everyone in the class is working on something different, and the teacher is there to help whenever you run into a difficulty or need help interpreting the pattern instructions.  There is no limit to the number of projects you can bring with you to class, so if you have a few wips sitting in detention, this may be the class for you.

As mentioned above, project classes are also great to take if there is a particular class that you weren't able to register for, due to the time slot it was offered in or if it was already full.   If you don't want to wait for the next time it runs, this may be your solution!

As a teacher, I find that these classes are great for skill building, as you can often learn from watching a classmate get help.  The social element of these classes is also great:  most of my students enjoy the chance to chat, commiserate, and celebrate with other knitters who "get it".  Because you are working on a project you picked out, there is also a guarantee that you'll be making something you'll love!


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